Mae West Plays Snow White

More Mae West:

• “I generally avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.”

• “Ten men waiting for me at the door? Send one of them home, I'm tired.”

• Below: Rapid-fire video of memorable lines:

• “When I'm good, I'm very good. But when I'm bad I'm better.”

• “You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.”

• “Why don’t you come up and see me sometime … when I’ve got nothin’ on but the radio.”

• “So many men … so little time.”

Above: West reportedly wrote the screenplay for this 1940 western spoof, the top box-office hit in 1940 after "Gone With The Wind" — but refused to work again with Fields after Universal gave Fields a co-writer's credit for his authorship of one small scene.

Above: West reportedly wrote the screenplay for this 1940 western spoof, the top box-office hit in 1940 after "Gone With The Wind" — but refused to work again with Fields after Universal gave Fields a co-writer's credit for his authorship of one small scene.

• “I’ll try anything once, twice if I like it, three times to make sure.”

• "It's not the men in my life that count, it's the life in my men.”

• “A man can be short and dumpy and getting bald but if he has fire, women will like him.”

• “Those who are easily shocked should be shocked more often.

• “I’ve been in more laps than a napkin.”

• “Too much of a good thing can be wonderful.”

Above: Released in 1933 as West and Grant were emerging stars, the film was produced for $200k and grossed $2m, garnering an Academy Award nomination for Best Production (now Best Picture) — at 66 minutes, the shortest film ever nominated in that category.

Above: Released in 1933 as West and Grant were emerging stars, the film was produced for $200k and grossed $2m, garnering an Academy Award nomination for Best Production (now Best Picture) — at 66 minutes, the shortest film ever nominated in that category.

Bios:

• Born Mary Jane West in Brooklyn, NY on August 17, 1893, child-performer “Baby May” became adult vaudeville star Mae West.

• West’s first starring role on Broadway came in 1926 in "Sex," which she wrote, produced and directed. The play was panned for explicit sexual content and West was convicted of morality violations, serving eight days in jail (reportedly dining with the warden and his wife a few times). Quite a boost for her career. 

• Later, West wrote plays dealing with homosexuality ("Drag," which she dared not perform in NY) and other “adult subject matter,” including trysts and sexual innuendo. 

• By 1932, then in her late 30s, West finally broke into Hollywood, appearing with George Raft in "Night after Night." Then came her starring role in "She Done Him Wrong" with Cary Grant and her famous line, “Why don’t you come up sometime and see me?”

• “In 1936, Mae West starred in the film "Klondike Annie," which concerned itself with religion and hypocrisy. William Randolph Hearst disagreed so vehemently with the film's context, and West's portrayal of a Salvation Army worker, that he personally forbade any stories or advertisements of the film to be published in any of his publications. However, the film did well at the box office and is considered the high-point of West's film career.” 

• Mae West died on November 22, 1980 at the age of 87.

W. C. Fields (1880-1946) was "an American comedian, actor, juggler and writer. Fields' comic persona was a misanthropic and hard-drinking egotist, who remained a sympathetic character despite his snarling contempt for dogs, children, and women." 

Cary Grant (1904-1986) born Archibald Leach in England, performed on British and American stages as a vaudeville stilt walker, acrobat, juggler and mime. Processed through Ellis Island in 1920, his "phenomenal physical grace and exquisite comic timing," debonair demeanor and good looks made Grant a classic Hollywood leading man.

(sources: biography.com, wikipedia, brainyquotes.com, allaboutmae.com)