Mae West Plays Snow White

More Mae West:

• “I generally avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.”

• “Ten men waiting for me at the door? Send one of them home, I'm tired.”

• Below: Rapid-fire video of memorable lines:

• “When I'm good, I'm very good. But when I'm bad I'm better.”

• “You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.”

• “Why don’t you come up and see me sometime … when I’ve got nothin’ on but the radio.”

• “So many men … so little time.”

Above:  West  reportedly wrote the screenplay for this 1940 western spoof, the top box-office hit in 1940 after "Gone With The Wind" — but refused to work again with  Fields  after Universal gave Fields a co-writer's credit for his authorship of one small scene.

Above: West reportedly wrote the screenplay for this 1940 western spoof, the top box-office hit in 1940 after "Gone With The Wind" — but refused to work again with Fields after Universal gave Fields a co-writer's credit for his authorship of one small scene.

• “I’ll try anything once, twice if I like it, three times to make sure.”

• "It's not the men in my life that count, it's the life in my men.”

• “A man can be short and dumpy and getting bald but if he has fire, women will like him.”

• “Those who are easily shocked should be shocked more often.

• “I’ve been in more laps than a napkin.”

• “Too much of a good thing can be wonderful.”

Above: Released in 1933 as  West  and  Grant  were emerging stars, the film was produced for $200k and grossed $2m, garnering an Academy Award nomination for Best Production (now Best Picture) — at 66 minutes, the shortest film ever nominated in that category.

Above: Released in 1933 as West and Grant were emerging stars, the film was produced for $200k and grossed $2m, garnering an Academy Award nomination for Best Production (now Best Picture) — at 66 minutes, the shortest film ever nominated in that category.

Bios:

• Born Mary Jane West in Brooklyn, NY on August 17, 1893, child-performer “Baby May” became adult vaudeville star Mae West.

• West’s first starring role on Broadway came in 1926 in "Sex," which she wrote, produced and directed. The play was panned for explicit sexual content and West was convicted of morality violations, serving eight days in jail (reportedly dining with the warden and his wife a few times). Quite a boost for her career. 

• Later, West wrote plays dealing with homosexuality ("Drag," which she dared not perform in NY) and other “adult subject matter,” including trysts and sexual innuendo. 

• By 1932, then in her late 30s, West finally broke into Hollywood, appearing with George Raft in "Night after Night." Then came her starring role in "She Done Him Wrong" with Cary Grant and her famous line, “Why don’t you come up sometime and see me?”

• “In 1936, Mae West starred in the film "Klondike Annie," which concerned itself with religion and hypocrisy. William Randolph Hearst disagreed so vehemently with the film's context, and West's portrayal of a Salvation Army worker, that he personally forbade any stories or advertisements of the film to be published in any of his publications. However, the film did well at the box office and is considered the high-point of West's film career.” 

• Mae West died on November 22, 1980 at the age of 87.

W. C. Fields (1880-1946) was "an American comedian, actor, juggler and writer. Fields' comic persona was a misanthropic and hard-drinking egotist, who remained a sympathetic character despite his snarling contempt for dogs, children, and women." 

Cary Grant (1904-1986) born Archibald Leach in England, performed on British and American stages as a vaudeville stilt walker, acrobat, juggler and mime. Processed through Ellis Island in 1920, his "phenomenal physical grace and exquisite comic timing," debonair demeanor and good looks made Grant a classic Hollywood leading man.

(sources: biography.com, wikipedia, brainyquotes.com, allaboutmae.com)

"Best" Summer Movies of All Time

2013 list

“Best Summer Movies of All Time” selected by RottenTomatoes.com 2013:

“In defense of the blockbuster, Rotten Tomatoes offers you Best Summer Movies, a countdown of the highest-rated wide releases since ... 1975 ... using a weighted formula that takes the Tomatometer, the number of reviews, and the year of release into account ... released wide ... between May and August.”

• “Oscar-worthy films appear at the box-office between Thanksgiving and Valentine’s Day followed by a lull on either side of summer’s blockbusters. Quality TV airs across the calendar year.” — Prof. Victoria Johnson, UC Irvine

Below: Click full-screen view and watch the magnificence of adult filmmaking (pre-CG) with a dazzling array of actors.

• “Television has taken possession of grown-ups and fans of things like narrative and character."

• "Hollywood studios construct their core businesses — cartoons, superhero films, young-adult franchises and sequels — for a less demanding clientele that doesn’t mind leaving the house even if the joy of the moviegoing experience is now marred by all the lapses of comfort and etiquette that keep many adults at home …”

• "Today, it’s the over-30 audience that’s written off as not worth the effort. Reaching them probably means rethinking distribution, even if that means surrendering the idea of movies as a primarily theatrical experience ... (and) treating the production of nonfranchise films as a viable business rather than as a favor or an act of atonement.” — Mark Harris, NY Times (3 quotes above)

gratuitous gif by fizzdom.com

gratuitous gif by fizzdom.com

• “Disney's 'Frozen' recently became the highest grossing animated feature of all time. The sci-fi thriller 'Gravity,' starring Sandra Bullock (above), has raked in over $700 million, and 'Hunger Games: Catching Fire' has banked about $864 million in box office sales. These movies all starred women, and yet the opportunities for women in film both in front of and behind the camera remains an uphill battle. According to a 2013 report, women made up 52 percent of the moviegoing population, yet only about 15 percent of current movies feature female protagonists.” — ReBecca Theodore-Vachon, film/tv critic

• Below: Enjoy a taste of 'Sharknado,' the "superstorm that sucked toothy killers out of the Pacific and hurled them at Los Angeles and landed in the waters of social media like a bucket of delicious chum ... (its title) a portmanteau of American excess to match the cronut and the turducken." — James Poniewozik, Time 

• “All the sincerity in Hollywood you could stuff in a flea's navel and still have room left to conceal eight caraway seeds and an agent's heart.” ― humorist Fred Allen

Woody Allen at a Crossroads

fizzdom.com woody allen at a crossroads movies entertainment despair utter hopelessness extinction music clarinet

• A self-described "militant Freudian atheist,” Woody Allen (born 1935 as Allan Stewart Konigsberg) has written and directed over 40 films and won four Academy Awards (3 for original screenplay, 1 for directing).

• Allen joked “that when he was young he was often sent to inter-faith summer camps, where he "was savagely beaten by children of all races and creeds."

• At 17 he ghost-wrote gags for newspaper columnists, calling himself Woody Allen and earning more than his parents’ salaries combined.

• Watch the famous scene above from Bananas (1971), with Fielding Mellish (Allen) on trial after inadvertently becoming the president of a banana republic. 

• Allen’s Annie Hall (1977) brought him the Oscar for Best Director and contains a long string of hilarious scenes, many with Diane Keaton.