Too Funny to be President

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• “Lord, give us the wisdom to utter words that are gentle and tender, for tomorrow we may have to eat them.”—Mo Udall

• Watch Jon Stewart's funny litany above of the Republican caucus' humorless hypocrisy. 

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• Called “too funny to be president” by a leading commentator, Udall compiled jokes in a book by the same name, saying, “After due deliberation and two stiff drinks, I decided to go ahead and write this book because I'm convinced that humor is as necessary to the health of our political discourse as it is in our private lives.”

• Rep. Morris “Mo” Udall (1922 – 1998) (D-AZ) served in Congress from 1961 to 1991. A former professional basketball player known for his wit and progressive causes (environment, campaign finance reform, Native Americans, National Parks, etc.) Mo replaced his brother Stewart in Congress. His son Mark Udall is currently a representative from Colorado, nephew Tom is a Senator from New Mexico, and second cousin Gordon Smith served as Senator from Oregon. 

• "The more we exploit nature, the more our options are reduced, until we have only one: to fight for survival." — Mo Udall

• "WASHINGTON (The Borowitz Report) - A broad-based coalition of millionaires converged on Washington today to defeat a bill that would have increased the minimum wage for American workers to $10.10 an hour. Leaving behind their mansions and yachts, the millionaires were motivated by what they saw as an existential threat to the country, Mitch McConnell, a spokesman for the millionaires, said." (Andy Borowitz - newyorker.com 4.29.14)

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• Collage above: Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is congratulated by R. McDonald, Director of Families for Lower Wages, after sealing demise of a higher minimum wage.

• Having lost a bruising battle to Jimmy Carter for the 1976 Democratic presidential nomination, Udall resisted entering the 1984 race: "If nominated, I shall run to Mexico. If elected, I shall fight extradition."