Why Women Mate

John Grimes cartoon (autobiographical) • grimescartoons.com

John Grimes cartoon (autobiographical) • grimescartoons.com

• “It isn’t enough to love; we must prove it." — St. Therese of Lisieux  (thx2 happiness project)

• Above: Custom paintings of a couple's recorded wedding vows expressed as audio waveforms - ©aimee weaver aimeeweaverdesigns.com

• Above: Custom paintings of a couple's recorded wedding vows expressed as audio waveforms - ©aimee weaver aimeeweaverdesigns.com

• "If there is such a thing as a good marriage, it is because it resembles friendship rather than love." — Michel de Montaigne

• Above: "Business Time" — hilarious romantic video-tune by Flight of the Conchords (28m+ views)

• “About one in five relationships starts online.” — Sam Yagan, co-founder of OkCupid

"Why Women's Hands and Feet Get Colder than Men's" (excerpt below):

"It’s the hands, face and feet that tend to be coldest and that’s partly because they’re exposed, but it’s also because the body will sacrifice these extremities to keep the internal organs warm.

That’s why our hands turn white, and even blue, in the cold, and why those who survive extremely cold conditions lose fingers and toes to frostbite. However, in some people — typically women — this process can go haywire, causing their blood vessels to shut down even from a minimal amount of cold.

‘We know from studies that if you lower people’s temperatures by placing them in cold air, vasoconstriction happens more quickly in women,’ says Professor Tipton. ‘The blood flow to skin is shut down sooner and more intensely than in men, and afterwards it takes women longer to warm up.’ 

So even though women may feel the cold more than men, it’s their skin temperaturenot their core body temperature — that’s colder

Indeed, a study of 219 people published in The Lancet in 1998 showed that while the body temperature of the women who were studied was on average 0.4 f hotter than the men, their hands were 2.8 f colder. This is partly due to hormones

In women, the female hormone oestrogen regulates the peripheral blood vessels; high levels of this hormone make them more sensitive to temperature. As a result, a woman’s temperature will vary during her menstrual cycle as oestrogen levels rise and fall."  Chloe Lambert, dailymail.co.uk